What does “Farm to Cup” mean?

In the coffee industry, roasters buy coffee from importers. The importers do much of the leg work of cupping large amounts of coffee, regularly dealing with farmers and exporters, arranging shipping, dealing with containers, and taking on much of the risks associated with coffee buying. The importers take care of the logistics. Then, samples of green coffee are sent to the roaster. The roaster then cups the samples, buys bags of coffee from the importer, and takes all the credit.

Importers help farmers with processing, transportation, and marketing their coffees. Often importers are an essential banking partner with farmers, with crop financing playing a big part in what they do. Importers buy coffees from farmers when the farmer is ready to sell, not just when there is roaster demand. Importers are very often the people that farmers can rely on to be repeat high-volume customers they can depend on. And importers are often the ones that aid roasters in having relationships with producers in the first place.

At Companie & Co, we are the roaster.  However, our roaster is also the importer. This is what Farm to Cup means and why it is better. We have a direct relationship with the farms through our roaster/importer. Having a direct relationship with the farms through our roaster/importer creates less of a separation between your cup and the origin, giving us greater control of the entire process in bringing you a superior cup of coffee.

Companie & Co goes one step farther, too. Orders are roasted to every order in small batches and shipped out the next day. It’s reminiscent of being on the farm sipping fresh coffee, that is roasted to peak perfection.

A Few of Our Favorite Farm to Cup Selections

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  • Deb
    Reply

    Awesome. You have a roaster? Understated and classy. I’m placing a sampler order.

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